Office of Academic Resources
Chulalongkorn University
Chulalongkorn University

Home / Help

AuthorWoodhouse, Nicholas M. J. author
TitleSpecial Relativity [electronic resource] / by Nicholas M. J. Woodhouse
ImprintLondon : Springer London : Imprint: Springer, 2003
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4471-0083-6
Descript X, 196 p. online resource

SUMMARY

Special relativity is one of the high points of the undergraduate mathematical physics syllabus. Nick Woodhouse writes for those approaching the subject with a background in mathematics: he aims to build on their familiarity with the foundational material and the way of thinking taught in first-year mathematics courses, but not to assume an unreasonable degree of prior knowledge of traditional areas of physical applied mathematics, particularly electromagnetic theory. His book provides mathematics students with the tools they need to understand the physical basis of special relativity and leaves them with a confident mathematical understanding of Minkowski's picture of space-time. Special Relativity is loosely based on the tried and tested course at Oxford, where extensive tutorials and problem classes support the lecture course. This is reflected in the book in the large number of examples and exercises, ranging from the rather simple through to the more involved and challenging. The author has included material on acceleration and tensors, and has written the book with an emphasis on space-time diagrams. Written with the second year undergraduate in mind, the book will appeal to those studying the 'Special Relativity' option in their Mathematics or Mathematics and Physics course. However, a graduate or lecturer wanting a rapid introduction to special relativity would benefit from the concise and precise nature of the book


CONTENT

1. Relativity in Classical Mechanics -- 1.1 Frames of Reference -- 1.2 Relativity -- 1.3 Frames of Reference -- 1.4 Newtonโ{128}{153}s Laws -- 1.5 Galilean Transformations -- 1.6 Mass, Energy, and Momentum -- 1.7 Space-time -- 1.8 *Galilean Symmetries -- 1.9 Historical Note -- 2. Maxwellโ{128}{153}s Theory -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Unification of Electricity and Magnetism -- 2.3 Charges, Fields, and the Lorentz Force Law -- 2.4 Stationary Distributions of Charge -- 2.5 The Divergence of the Magnetic Field -- 2.6 Inconsistency with Galilean Relativity -- 2.7 The Limits of Galilean Invariance -- 2.8 Faradayโ{128}{153}s Law of Induction -- 2.9 The Field of Charges in Uniform Motion -- 2.10 Maxwellโ{128}{153}s Equations -- 2.11 The Continuity Equation -- 2.12 Conservation of Charge -- 2.13 Historical Note -- 3. The Propagation of Light -- 3.1 The Displacement Current -- 3.2 The Source-free Equations -- 3.3 The Wave Equation -- 3.4 Monochromatic Plane Waves -- 3.5 Polarization -- 3.6 Potentials -- 3.7 Gauge Transformations -- 3.8 Photons -- 3.9 Relativity and the Propagation of Light -- 3.10 The Michelson-Morley Experiment -- 4. Einsteinโ{128}{153}s Special Theory of Relativity -- 4.1 Lorentzโ{128}{153}s Contraction -- 4.2 Operational Definitions of Distance and Time -- 4.3 The Relativity of Simultaneity -- 4.4 Bondiโ{128}{153}s fc-Factor -- 4.5 Time Dilation -- 4.6 The Two-dimensional Lorentz Transformation -- 4.7 Transformation of Velocity -- 4.8 The Lorentz Contraction -- 4.9 Composition of Lorentz Transformations -- 4.10 Rapidity -- 4.11 *The Lorentz and Poincarรฉ Groups -- 5. Lorentz Transformations in Four Dimensions -- 5.1 Coordinates in Four Dimensions -- 5.2 Four-dimensional Coordinate Transformations -- 5.3 The Lorentz Transformation in Four Dimensions -- 5.4 The Standard Lorentz Transformation -- 5.5 The General Lorentz Transformation -- 5.6 Euclidean Space and Minkowski Space -- 5.7 Four-vectors -- 5.8 Temporal and Spatial Parts -- 5.9 The Inner Product -- 5.10 Classification of Four-vectors -- 5.11 Causal Structure of Minkowski Space -- 5.12 Invariant Operators -- 5.13 The Frequency Four-vector -- 5.14 * Affine Spaces and Covectors -- 6. Relative Motion -- 6.1 Transformations Between Frames -- 6.2 Proper Time -- 6.3 Four-velocity -- 6.4 Four-acceleration -- 6.5 Constant Acceleration -- 6.6 Continuous Distributions -- 6.7 *Rigid Body Motion -- 6.8 Visual Observation -- 7. Relativistic Collisions -- 7.1 The Operational Definition of Mass -- 7.2 Conservation of Four-momentum -- 7.3 Equivalence of Mass and Energy -- 8. Relativistic Electrodynamics -- 8.1 Lorentz Transformations of E and B -- 8.2 The Four-Current and the Four-potential -- 8.3 Transformations of E and B -- 8.4 Linearly Polarized Plane Waves -- 8.5 Electromagnetic Energy -- 8.6 The Four-momentum of a Photon -- 8.7 *Advanced and Retarded Solutions -- 9. *Tensors and Isomet ries -- 9.1 Affine Space -- 9.2 The Lorentz Group -- 9.3 Tensors -- 9.4 The Tensor Product -- 9.5 Tensors in Minkowski Space -- 9.6 Tensor Components -- 9.7 Examples of Tensors -- 9.8 One-parameter Subgroups -- 9.9 Isometries -- 9.10 The Riemann Sphere and Spinors -- Notes on Exercises -- Vector Calculus


Mathematics Applied mathematics Engineering mathematics Physics Gravitation Mathematics Applications of Mathematics Classical and Quantum Gravitation Relativity Theory Mathematical Methods in Physics



Location



Office of Academic Resources, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd. Pathumwan Bangkok 10330 Thailand

Contact Us

Tel. 0-2218-2929,
0-2218-2927 (Library Service)
0-2218-2903 (Administrative Division)
Fax. 0-2215-3617, 0-2218-2907

Social Network

  line

facebook   instragram