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TitleThe Perception of Visual Information [electronic resource] / edited by William R. Hendee, Peter N. T. Wells
ImprintNew York, NY : Springer New York : Imprint: Springer, 1997
Edition Second Edition
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4612-1836-4
Descript XVIII, 409 p. online resource

SUMMARY

The presentation and interpretation of visual information is essential to almost every activity in human life and most endeavors of modern technology. This book examines the current status of what is known (and not known) about human vision, how human observers interpret visual data, and how to present such data to facilitate their interpretation and use. Written by experts who are able to cross disciplinary boundaries, the book provides an educational pathway through several models of human vision; describes how the visual response is analyzed and quantified; presents current theories of how the human visual response is interpreted; discusses the cognitive responses of human observers; and examines such applications as space exploration, manufacturing, surveillance, earth and air sciences, and medicine. The book is intended for everyone with an undergraduate-level background in science or engineering with an interest in visual science. This second edition has been brought up to date throughout and contains a new chapter on "Virtual reality and augmented reality in medicine."


CONTENT

1 Physiological Optics -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Optical Anatomy of the Eye -- 1.3 Aberrations of the Eye -- 1.4 The Visual Pathways -- 1.5 Mechanisms of Viewing -- 1.6 ColorVision -- 1.7 Physical Performance of the Visual System -- 1.8 Information Transfer Rates -- 1.9 References -- 2 Detection of Vision Information -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Early Theories of Vision -- 2.3 Simple Experiments -- 2.4 Adaptation and After Images -- 2.5 Three-Dimensional Vision -- 2.6 Stereoscopic Viewing -- 2.7 Cross-Eyed Technique of Three-Dimensional Viewing -- 2.8 Models of the Visual System -- 2.9 References -- 3 Quantification of Visual Capability -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Visual Acuity -- 3.3 Contrast Sensitivity -- 3.4 Visual Physiology -- 3.5 Visual Filtering -- 3.6 Causes of Vision Loss -- 3.7 Detection and Identification of Visual Signals -- 3.8 Conclusions -- 3.9 References -- 4 A Multiscale Geometric Model of Human Vision -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Scale-Space -- 4.3 Scaled Differential Operators -- 4.4 Image Structure -- 4.5 Description of the Early Vision System -- 4.6 Differential Invariants -- 4.7 Applications -- 4.8 Discussion -- 4.9 References -- 5 Human Response to Visual Stimuli -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Measuring Human Responses -- 5.3 Complex Stimuli -- 5.4 References -- 6 Cognitive Interpretation of Visual Signals -- 6.1 Early Views of Cognition -- 6.2 Western Philosophical Speculations on Cognition -- 6.3 Visual Texture Discrimination -- 6.4 Illusions -- 6.5 Color Vision -- 6.6 References -- 7 Visual Data Formatting -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Brightness, Contrast, and Details -- 7.3 Texture Discrimination and Edge Detection -- 7.4 Medical Imaging and Information -- 7.5 Visual Information and Communication -- 7.6 Conclusions -- 7.7 References -- 8 Image Manipulation -- 8.1 Introduction: The Digital Image -- 8.2 Interpolation -- 8.3 Gray-Level Manipulation -- 8.4 Filtering -- 8.5 Geometric Processing and Image Co-Registration -- 8.6 Image Subtraction -- 8.7 Segmentation -- 8.8 Maximum Intensity Projection -- 8.9 Conclusion -- 8.10 References -- 9 Physical and Psychophysical Measurement of Images -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Physical Measurements of Image Quality -- 9.3 Limitations of Physical Analysis -- 9.4 Measuring Observer Performance: Basic Principles of ROC analysis -- 9.5 General Issues Regarding the Use of ROC Methods in Medical Imaging Research -- 9.6 Statistical Issues in ROC Analysis -- 9.7 References -- 10 Computer Vision and Decision Support -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Computer Vision -- 10.3 Computer Vision Examples -- 10.4 Decision Support -- 10.5 A Decision Support Example: Mammography -- 10.6 Combining Decision Support and Computer Vision -- 10.7 References -- 11 Architecture and Ergonomics of Imaging Workstations -- 11.1 Architecture of Imaging Workstation -- 11.2 Examples of Imaging Workstation -- 11.3 Ergonomics of Imaging Workstation -- 11.4 References -- 12 Virtual Reality and Augmented Reality in Medicine -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Medical Applications of VR Technology -- 12.3 Augmented Reality in Image-Guided Surgery -- 12.4 Conclusions and Future Work -- 12.5 References -- 13 Problems and Prospects in the Perception of Visual Information -- 13.1 Aspects ofVisual Perception -- 13.2 Conclusions -- 13.3 References


Medicine Pattern recognition Biophysics Biological physics Medicine & Public Health Medicine/Public Health general Biophysics and Biological Physics Pattern Recognition



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