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AuthorDeLisi, Charles. author
TitleAntigen Antibody Interactions [electronic resource] / by Charles DeLisi
ImprintBerlin, Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 1976
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-93044-7
Descript IV, 142 p. online resource

SUMMARY

1. 1 Organization of the Immune System One of the most important survival mechanisms of vertebrates is their ability to recognize and respond to the onslaught of pathogenic microbes to which they are conti- ously exposed. The collection of host cells and molecules involved in this recognitionยญ 12 response function constitutes its immune system. In man, it comprises about 10 cells 20 (lymphocytes) and 10 molecules (immunoglobulins). Its ontogenic development is c- strained by the requirement that it be capable of responding to an almost limitless variety of molecular configurations on foreign substances, while simultaneously remaining inert to those on self components. It has thus evolved to discriminate, with exquisite precision, between molecular patterns. The foreign substances which induce a response, called antigens, are typically large molecules such as proteins and polysaccharides. The portions of these with which immunoglobulins interact are called epitopes or determinants. A typical protein epitope may consist of a configuration formed by the spatial arrangements of four or five amino acids and have an average linear dimension of about 20 A


CONTENT

1. Introduction -- 1. Organization of the Immune System -- 2. Antibody Structure -- 3. The Theory of Clonal Selection -- 2. Hinge and Valence Effects on Antibody Binding Properties -- 1. General Considerations -- 2. The Two-Particle Probability Density Function -- 3. The Crothers-Metzger Model -- 4. Analysis of Experiments -- 5. Immunological Implications -- 3. Combining site heterogeneity. The free energy distribution function -- 1. Statement of the Problem -- 2. Inversion of the Binding Curve -- 3. Intramolecular Reactions -- 4. Immunological Implications -- 4. Combining Site Heterogeneity. Immunodiffusion -- 1. General Remarks -- 2. A Simple Diffusion-Reaction Model for Plaque Formation -- 3. The Solution -- 4. Applications -- 5. The Theory of Plaque Growth Kinetics For A Lymphocyte SOURCE -- 1. Introduction -- 2. A Diffusion-Reaction Model -- 3. Solutions Under Limiting Conditions -- 4. Models Allowing Reversible Reactions -- 5. A Diffusion-Transport-Reaction Model. Electrophoresis -- 6. Predictions of the Theory -- 6. Plaque Inhibition: Growth In The Presence Of Competitive Interactions -- 1. Introduction -- 2. IgG Plaque Inhibition -- 3. Predictions -- 7. Applications Of Plaque Growth Theory And Immunological Implications -- 1. The IgM Response -- 2. The IgG Response -- 3. Summary of Conclusions -- 8. Dynamical Phenomena on Lymphocyte Membranes -- 1. Background and Definitions -- 2. The Dynamics of Antigen-Antibody Aggregation in Three Dimensions -- 3. Critical Coalescence on Lymphocyte Membranes -- 4. Immunological Implications of the Model -- 5. Future Problems


Mathematics Mathematics Mathematics general



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