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AuthorHeck, Andrรฉ. author
TitleIntroduction to Maple [electronic resource] / by Andrรฉ Heck
ImprintNew York, NY : Springer US, 1996
Edition Second Edition
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4684-0484-5
Descript online resource

SUMMARY

The first edition of this book has been very well received by the community. The new version 4 of Maple V contains so many new mathematical features and improvements in the user interface that Waterloo Maple Inc. markets it as "the Power Edition. " These two facts have made it necessary to write a second edition within a short period of the first. I corrected typographical errors, rephrased text, updated and improved many examples, and added much new material. Hardly any chapter has been left untouched. Substanยญ tially changed or added sections and chapters address the assume facility, I/O, approximation theory, integration, composite data types, simplificaยญ tion, graphics, differential equations, and matrix algebra. Tables summaยญ rize features, command options, etc. , and constitute a quick reference. The enlarged index of the book has been carefully compiled to make locating search items quick and easy. Many new examples have been included showยญ ing how to use Maple as a problem solver, how to assist the system during computations, and how to extend its built-in facilities. About the Maple Version Used The second edition of this book is fully revised and updated to Maple V Release 4. More precisely, the second edition of this book was produced with Maple V Release 4, beta 3 on a SUN SPARCstation 20, Model 71. There should be hardly any difference between this beta version and the final release; only minor differences in the user interface are not excluded


CONTENT

1 Introduction to Computer Algebra -- 1.1 What is Computer Algebra? -- 1.2 Computer Algebra Systems -- 1.3 Some Properties of Computer Algebra Systems -- 1.4 Advantages of Computer Algebra -- 1.5 Limitations of Computer Algebra -- 1.6 Design of Maple -- 2 The First Steps: Calculus on Numbers -- 2.1 Getting Started -- 2.2 Getting Help -- 2.3 Integers and Rational Numbers -- 2.4 Irrational Numbers and Floating-Point Numbers -- 2.5 Algebraic Numbers -- 2.6 Complex Numbers -- 2.7 Exercises -- 3 Variables and Names -- 3.1 Assignment and Unassignment -- 3.2 Evaluation -- 3.3 Names of Variables -- 3.4 Basic Data Types -- 3.5 Attributes -- 3.6 Properties -- 3.7 Exercises -- 4 Getting Around with Maple -- 4.1 Maple Input and Output -- 4.2 The Maple Library -- 4.3 Reading and Writing Files -- 4.4 Importing and Exporting Numerical Data -- 4.5 Low-Level I/O -- 4.6 Code Generation -- 4.7 Changing Maple to Your Own Taste -- 4.8 Exercises -- 5 Polynomials and Rational Functions -- 5.1 Univariate Polynomials -- 5.2 Multivariate Polynomials -- 5.3 Rational Functions -- 5.4 Conversions -- 5.5 Exercises -- 6 Internal Data Representation and Substitution -- 6.1 Internal Representation of Polynomials -- 6.2 Generalized Rational Expressions -- 6.3 Substitution -- 6.4 Exercises -- 7 Manipulation of Polynomials and Rational Expressions -- 7.1 Expansion -- 7.2 Factorization -- 7.3 Canonical Form and Normal Form -- 7.4 Normalization -- 7.5 Collection -- 7.6 Sorting -- 7.7 Exercises -- 8 Functions -- 8.1 Mathematical Functions -- 8.2 Arrow Operators -- 8.3 Piecewise Defined Functions -- 8.4 Maple Procedures -- 8.5 Recursive Procedure Definitions -- 8.6 unapply -- 8.7 Operations on Functions -- 8.8 Anonymous Functions -- 8.9 Exercises -- 9 Differentiation -- 9.1 Symbolic Differentiation -- 9.2 Automatic Differentiation -- 9.3 Exercises -- 10 Integration and Summation -- 10.1 Indefinite Integration -- 10.2 Definite Integration -- 10.3 Numerical Integration -- 10.4 Integral Transforms -- 10.5 Assisting Mapleโ{128}{153}s Integrator -- 10.6 Summation -- 10.7 Exercises -- 11 Series, Approximation, and Limits -- 11.1 Truncated Series -- 11.2 Approximation of Functions -- 11.3 Power Series -- 11.4 Limits -- 11.5 Exercises -- 12 Composite Data Types -- 12.1 Sequence -- 12.2 Set -- 12.3 List -- 12.4 Array -- 12.5 Table -- 12.6 Last Name Evaluation -- 12.7 Function Call -- 12.8 Conversion Between Composite Data Types -- 12.9 Exercises -- 13 The Assume Facility -- 13.1 The Need for an Assume Facility -- 13.2 Basics of assume -- 13.3 An Algebra of Properties -- 13.4 Implementation of assume -- 13.5 Exercises -- 13.6 Hierarchy of Properties -- 14 Simplification -- 14.1 Automatic Simplification -- 14.2 expand -- 14.3 combine -- 14.4 simplify -- 14.5 convert -- 14.6 Trigonometric Simplification -- 14.7 Simplification w.r.t. Side Relations -- 14.8 Control Over Simplification -- 14.9 Defining Your Own Simplification Routines -- 14.10 Exercises -- 14.11 Simplification Chart -- 15 Graphics -- 15.1 Some Basic Two-Dimensional Plots -- 15.2 Options of plot -- 15.3 The Structure of Two-Dimensional Graphics -- 15.4 The plottools Package -- 15.5 Special Two-Dimensional Plots -- 15.6 Two-Dimensional Geometry -- 15.7 Plot Aliasing -- 15.8 A Common Mistake -- 15.9 Some Basic Three-Dimensional Plots -- 15.10 Options of plot3d -- 15.11 The Structure of Three-Dimensional Graphics -- 15.12 Special Three-Dimensional Plots -- 15.13 Data Plotting -- 15.14 Animation -- 15.15 List of Plot Options -- 15.16 Exercises -- 16 Solving Equations -- 16.1 Equations in One Unknown -- 16.2 Abbreviations in solve -- 16.3 Some Difficulties -- 16.4 Systems of Equations -- 16.5 The Grรถbner Basis Method -- 16.6 Inequalities -- 16.7 Numerical Solvers -- 16.8 Other Solvers in Maple -- 16.9 Exercises -- 17 Differential Equations -- 17.1 First Glance at ODEs -- 17.2 Analytic Solutions -- 17.3 Taylor Series Method -- 17.4 Power Series Method -- 17.5 Numerical Solutions -- 17.6 DEtools -- 17.7 Perturbation Methods -- 17.8 Partial Differential Equations -- 17.9 Lie Point Symmetries of PDEs -- 17.10 Exercises -- 18 Linear Algebra: The linalg Package -- 18.1 Loading the linalg Package -- 18.2 Creating New Vectors and Matrices -- 18.3 Vector and Matrix Arithmetic -- 18.4 Basic Matrix Functions -- 18.5 Structural Operations -- 18.6 Vector Operations -- 18.7 Standard Forms of Matrices -- 18.8 Exercises -- 19 Linear Algebra: Applications -- 19.1 Kinematics of the Stanford Manipulator -- 19.2 A Three-Compartment Model of Cadmium Transfer -- 19.3 Molecular-Orbital Hรผckel Theory -- 19.4 Vector Analysis -- 19.5 Moore-Penrose Inverse -- 19.6 Exercises -- References


Mathematics Chemistry Physical and theoretical Computer science -- Mathematics Computer graphics Algebra Mathematical analysis Analysis (Mathematics) Physics Mathematics Algebra Analysis Theoretical and Computational Chemistry Symbolic and Algebraic Manipulation Computer Graphics Mathematical Methods in Physics



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