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AuthorBurke, Harry E. author
TitleHandbook of Magnetic Phenomena [electronic resource] / by Harry E. Burke
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 1986
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-7006-2
Descript XXII, 424 p. online resource

SUMMARY

The general theory of magnetism and the vast range of individual pheยญ nomena it embraces have already been examined in many volumes. Speยญ cialists hardly need help in charting their way through the maze of pubยญ lished information. At the same time, a nonspecialist might easily be discouraged by this abundance. Most texts are restricted in their coverage, and their concepts may well appear to be disorganized when the uninitiated attempt to consider them in their totality. Since the subject is already thoroughly researched with very little new information added year by year, this is hardly a satisfactory state of affairs. By now, it should be possible for anyone with even a minimum of technical competence to feel comยญ pletely at home with all of the basic magnetic principles. The present volume addresses this issue by stressing simplicity-simยญ plicity of order and simplicity of range as well as simplicity of detail. It proposes a pattern of logical classification based on the electronic conยญ sequences that result whenever any form of matter interacts with any kind of energy. An attempt has been made to present each phenomenon of interest in its most visually graphic form while reducing the verbal deยญ scription to the minimum needed to back up the illustrations. This might be called a Life magazine type of approach, in which each point is prinยญ cipally supported by a picture. The illustrations make use of two (perhaps unique) conventions


CONTENT

1. Introduction -- 1.1 Magnetotransduction -- 1.2 Discussion Boundaries -- 1.3 Model -- 1.4 Audience -- 1.5 Theme -- I: Environments Experienced by Moving Electric Charges -- 2. Basic Laws and Definitions -- 3. Chemical Effects -- 4. Magnetic Hysteresis -- 5. Thermal Effects -- 6. Mechanical Effects -- 7. Magnetic Measurements -- 8. Magnetic Resonance -- 9. Radiant Energy -- II: The Effects of Magnetic Field Changes on MovingCharged Particles -- 10. Moving Conductor -- 11. Electromagnetic Induction -- 12. Reflected Impedance -- 13. Reluctance Variations -- 14. Composite Targets -- 15. Motor Phenomena -- III: Magnetons Moving Under Tight Constraints As in a Solid or Liquid -- 16. Magnetostriction -- 17. Galvanomagnetic Effects -- 18. Magneton Order Effects -- 19. Hysteretic Effects -- 20. Size Effects -- 21. Strong Magnetic Field Effects -- IV: Magnetons Moving Under Loose Constraints As in a Vacuum or Gas -- 22. Ionic Currents -- 23. Magnetron Effects in Gas -- V: Magnetons Moving in Environments with a Very Low Energy Content -- 24. Chemical Environment -- 25. Flux Quantization -- 26. Tunneling -- Glossary of Terms


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