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AuthorLovell, M. C. author
TitlePhysical Properties of Materials [electronic resource] / by M. C. Lovell, A. J. Avery, M. W. Vernon
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands : Imprint: Springer, 1976
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-6065-0
Descript XII, 304 p. online resource

SUMMARY

Materials Science has now become established as a discipline in its own right as well as being of increasing importance in the fields of Physics, Chemistry and Engineering. To the student meeting this subject for the first time the combination of disciplines which it embraces represents a formidable challenge. He will require to understand the lanยญ guage of the physicist and chemist as well as appreciate the practical uses and limitaยญ tions of solid materials. This book has been written as an introduction to the Physical Properties of Materials with these thoughts in mind. The mathematical content has been limited deliberately and emphasis is placed on providing a sound basis using simplified models. Once these are understood we feel that a mathematical approach is more readily assimilated and for this purpose supplementary reading is suggested. While the authors are deeply aware of the pitfalls in attempting such a treatment this is meant to be an essentially simple book to point the many avenues to be explored. We anticipate that the book will appeal to first and second year degree students in a variety of disciplines and may not prove too difficult for those studying appropriate Higher National Certificate and Diploma courses. Electrical engineers working in the field of materials applications may well find it useful as a guide to modern thinking about materials and their properties. The book begins with an introduction to some basic ideas of modern physics


CONTENT

1 Fundamentals -- 1.1 Introduction -- 1.2 Wave mechanics -- 1.4 Transition elements -- 1.5 Atomic magnetism -- 1.6 Electrons in solids -- 2 Structure of Solids -- 2.1 Introductionโ{128}{148}atomic bonding -- 2.2 Crystal structure -- 2.3 Lattice planes and directions -- 2.4 Atomic packing -- 2.5 Covalent solids -- 2.6 Ionic solids -- 2.7 Summary -- 2.8 Lattice imperfections -- 2.9 Lattice vibrations -- 2.10 Point defects -- 2.11 Line defects -- 2.12 Plane defects -- 2.13 Amorphous materials -- 3 Preparation of Materials -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Mechanism of crystal growth -- 3.3 Growth from the melt -- 3.4 Non-melt techniques -- 3.5 Thin films -- 3.6 The origin of dislocations during crystal growth -- 3.7 Non-crystalline materials -- 3.8 Amorphous semiconductors -- 3.9 Plastic materials -- 4 Practical Determination of Structure -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Theoretical X-ray diffraction -- 4.3 Practical X-ray diffraction -- 4.4 Other applications of X-ray diffraction -- 4.5 Neutron diffraction -- 4.6 Electron diffraction -- 4.7 Structure of amorphous materials -- 4.8 Other techniques -- 5 Mechanical Properties of Materials -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Mechanical testing -- 5.3 Elastic behaviour -- 5.4 Plastic behaviour -- 5.5 Fracture -- 5.6 Strengthening of materials -- 5.7 Creep -- 5.8 Mechanical properties of plastics -- 6 Thermal Properties -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Thermal statistics -- 6.3 Heat capacity -- 6.4 Specific heat anomalies -- 6.5 Thermal expansion -- 6.6 Thermal conductivity -- 6.7 Thermoelectricity -- 7 Electrical Properties -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Metals -- 7.3 Semiconductors -- 7.4 Transition metal compounds -- 7.5 Polarons -- 7.6 Magnetic semiconductors -- 7.7 Amorphous materials -- 7.8 Switching -- 8 Dielectrics -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Mechanisms of polarization -- 8.3 The local field -- 8.4 The Clausius-Mosotti relation -- 8.5 Dielectric relaxation -- 8.6 Applications -- 8.7 Piezoelectric, pyroelectric and ferroelectric materials -- 8.8 Piezoelectricity -- 8.9 Ferroelectricity -- 8.10 Classification of ferroelectric materials -- 8.11 Barium titanate -- 8.12 Ferroelectric ceramics -- 8.13 Ferroelectric domains -- 8.14 Pyroelectricity -- 9 Magnetic Properties -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Classification of magnetic materials -- 9.3 Diamagnetism -- 9.4 Paramagnetism 187 9.4.1 Pauli paramagnetism -- 9.5 Ferromagnetism -- 9.6 Magnetic anisotropy -- 9.7 Magnetostriction -- 9.8 Ferromagnetic domains -- 9.9 Microscopic explanations of ferromagnetism -- 9.10 Applications of ferromagnetic materials -- 9.11 Antiferromagnetism -- 9.12 Antiferromagnetic compounds -- 9.13 Antiferromagnetic domains -- 9.14 Ferrimagnetism -- 9.15 Ferrimagnetic domainsโ{128}{148}magnetic bubbles -- 9.16 Magnetic ceramics -- 9.17 Applications of ferrimagnetic materials -- 10 Optical Properties -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Refractive index -- 10.3 Absorption -- 10.4 Reflection -- 10.5 Natural birefringence -- 10.6 Induced birefringence -- 10.7 Non-linear optics -- 10.8 Secondary processes -- 10.9 Lasers -- 11 Superconductivity -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 Resistanceless and superconducting states -- 11.3 Superconductivity -- 11.4 Penetration depth -- 11.5 The two-fluid model -- 11.6 The intermediate state -- 11.7 Coherence length -- 11.8 Type II superconductors -- 11.9 Theory of superconductivity -- 11.10 Superconducting materials and their applications -- Appendix I Electrons in Solids -- A1.1 The free electron model -- A1.2 The band model -- A1.3 Electrons and holes-effective mass -- Appendix II Periodic Chart of the Elements -- Appendix III List of the Elements -- Table of Physical Constants -- Answers to Questions


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