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AuthorNeeleman, Ad. author
TitleFlexible Syntax [electronic resource] : A Theory of Case and Arguments / by Ad Neeleman, Fred Weerman
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands : Imprint: Springer, 1999
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-011-4289-2
Descript XI, 253 p. online resource

SUMMARY

Most linguistic theories assume that each grammatical relation is established in a unique structural configuration. Neeleman and Weerman take issue with this view, arguing for a more flexible approach on the basis of conceptual considerations and data taken mostly, but not exclusively, from the Germanic languages. In-depth analyses of word order phenomena as well as diachronic and typological generalizations motivate a re-evaluation of the role of case in the projection of arguments. Case is shown to provide a syntactic foothold for thematic interpretation, something which is necessary in a grammar that does not allow fixed theta-positions. Thus, this study does not only offer a genuine alternative to many standard assumptions, it also explains why there should be such a thing as case in natural language


CONTENT

1: Prologue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Case Theory -- 3. ?-Theory -- 4. Word Order -- 5. Overview -- Bibliographical Note -- 2: The OV/VO Parameter -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Domain of ?-role Assignment -- 3. The Domains of Head Government -- 4. The Formation of VP Shells -- 5. Particles -- 6. Scrambling -- 7. Double Object Constructions -- 8. Exceptional Case Marking -- 9. Concluding Remarks -- 3: Morphological Case -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Asymmetries between Nominative and Case -- 3. Syntactic Effects of Morphological Case -- 4. Toward a Theory of Case Features -- 5. Concluding Remarks -- 4: Prepositional Complements -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Problem -- 3. Indirect ?-Role Assignment -- 4. LF Incorporation -- 5. Empirical Consequences -- 6. PP Complements to Nouns -- 7. Concluding Remarks -- 5: Raising to Subject -- 1. Introduction -- 2. ?-Role Promotion as Aโ{128}{153}-Movement -- 3. NP Raising as Null Operator Movement -- 4. Short versus Long Null Operator Movement -- 5. Improper Movement -- 6. Concluding Remarks -- 6: Head Marking -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Head-Marking Affixes -- 3. Absolutive-Ergative Languages -- 4. VSO Languages -- 5. The Linearization of Subjects -- 6. Concluding Remarks -- 7: Epilogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Falsifiability -- 3. Flexibility -- References


Linguistics Comparative linguistics Germanic languages Historical linguistics Syntax Linguistics Theoretical Linguistics Syntax Comparative Linguistics Germanic Languages Historical Linguistics



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