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Authorร{152}verenget, Einar. author
TitleSeeing the Self [electronic resource] : Heidegger on Subjectivity / by Einar ร{152}verenget
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 1998
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-9768-0
Descript 348 p. online resource

SUMMARY

" . . . die Augen hat mir Husserl eingesetzt. ,,1 he aim of Twentieth century phenomenology is to provide a nonยญ T psychologistic interpretation of subjectivity. Husserl agrees with Frege; to adopt psychologism is to give up truth. But this should not prevent us from investigating the subjective perspective. On the contrary, Husserl thinks that an appropriate rejection of psychologism must be able to show how propositions are correlated to and grounded in subjective intuitions without thereby reducing them to psychological phenomena. Obviously this calls for an interpretation of subjectivity that makes a sharp distinction between the subjective perspective and the psychological realm. Phenomenology is devoted to the development of a notion of subjectivity that is in accordance with our experience of the world. A fundamental tenet of phenomenology is that philosophy should not dispute this experience but rather account for it. Hence, phenomenology must avoid a notion of subjectivity in which it becomes a problem to account for how a subject can ever hook up with the world. In other words, a phenomenological interpretation of subjectivity must radically disassociate itself from what is often referred to as a worldless, Cartesian subject, a res cogitans. But neither can an interpretation of SUbjectivity consistently advocate a position according to which the human order is described only in the categories appropriate to the physical order. Such an interpretation is obviously not compatible with the phenomenal basis for undertaking this very interpretation, that is, our experience of the world


CONTENT

I. Wholes and Parts -- 1. Husserl on Wholes and Parts -- 2. Wholes and Parts and Transcendental Phenomenology -- 3. The Presence of the Theory of Wholes and Parts in Being and Time -- 4. The Theory of Wholes and Parts in Heideggerโ{128}{153}s Marburg-Lectures -- 5. The Concreteness of the Seinsfrage -- II. Categorial Intuition -- 1. Husserl on Seeing Objects of Higher Levels -- 2. Intentionality and Evidence -- 3. Categorial Intuition -- 4. Heideggerโ{128}{153}s Analysis of Categorial Intuition -- 5. Intentional Fulfillment -- 6. Intuition and Expression -- 7. Categorial Acts: Synthesis and Ideation -- 8. Constitution -- III. Apriorism -- 1. The Phenomenological Sense of the Apriori -- 2. Analytic Description of Intentionality in its Apriori -- 3. Pure Consciousness -- 4. The Being of Consciousness -- 5. Apriori and Concretum -- IV. Existence -- 1. The Phenomenological Reduction and the Analysis of Dasein -- 2. Dasein as Existence -- 3. Situatedness -- 4. Understanding -- 5. Seeing: Understanding, Interpretation, Assertion -- 6. Being-There: Discourse and Falling -- 7. Care -- V. Self-Consciousness -- 1. Phenomenology and Self-Consciousness -- 2. Sartreโ{128}{153}s Critique of Husserl -- 3. Kant on the Original Synthetic Unity of Apperception -- 4. Transcendental Apperception and Non-Positional Awareness -- 5. Heidegger and Egology -- VI. Constitution -- 1. Being and Constitution -- 2. Equipment -- 3. Pre-Ontological Confirmation -- 4. Reference -- 5. World -- 6. Disclosedness and Discoveredness -- VII. Self -- 1. Arendt on the Human Condition -- 2. Poiesis -- 3. Inauthenticity -- 4. The One (das Man) -- 5. Praxis -- VIII. Unity -- 1. The Question of Primordial Totality -- 2. Anxiety -- 3. Being-a-whole -- 4. Death -- 5. Death and Possibility -- 6. Authenticity -- 7. Resoluteness -- IX. Temporality -- 1. The Traditional Theory of Time and the Temporality of Praxis -- 2. The Temporality of Transcendental Apperception -- 3. Husserl and the Temporality of Absolute Consciousness -- 4. Anticipatory Resoluteness -- 5. Temporality -- 6. Repeating the Existential Analysis -- 7. Temporality and Egology -- Conclusion


Philosophy Metaphysics Modern philosophy Ontology Phenomenology Philosophy Phenomenology Ontology Modern Philosophy Metaphysics



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