Office of Academic Resources
Chulalongkorn University
Chulalongkorn University

Home / Help

TitleThe Physics of Glassy Polymers [electronic resource] / edited by R. N. Haward
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands, 1973
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-2355-9
Descript XVI, 620 p. online resource

SUMMARY

This work sets out to provide an up-to-date account of the physical properties and structure of polymers in the glassy state. Properties measured above the glass transition temperature are therefore included only in so far as is necessary for the treatment of the glass transition process. This approach to the subject therefore excludes any detailed account of rubber elasticity or melt rheology or of the structure and conformation of the long chain molecule in solution, although knowledge derived from this field is assumed where required. Major emphasis is placed on structural and mechanical properties, although a number of other physical properties are included. Naturally the different authors contributing to the book write mainly from their own particular points of view and where there are several widely accepted theoretical approaches to a subject, these are sometimes provided in different chapters which will necessarily overlap to a significant extent. For example, the main theoretical presentation on the subject of glass transition is given in Chapter 1. This is supplemented by accounts of the free volume theory in Chapter 3 and in the Introduction, and a short account of the work of Gibbs and DiMarzio, also in Chapter 3. Similarly, there is material on solvent cracking in Chapters 7 and 9, though the two workers approach the subject from opposite directions. Every effort has therefore been made to encourage cross-referencing between different chapters


CONTENT

(The Nature of Polymer Glasses, Their Packing Density and Mechanical Behaviour) -- The Nature of Polymeric Glasses -- Packing Volume in the Glassy State -- The Rigidity of Polymer Glasses -- Large Deformations and Fracture -- References -- 1 The Thermodynamics of the Glassy State -- 1.1 Introductory Thermodynamic Considerations -- 1.2 Glassy Solidification and Transition Phenomena -- 1.3 Results of the Thermodynamic Theory of Linear Relaxation Phenomena -- 1.4 Glassy Mixed Phases -- 1.5 The Mobility and Structure of Glassy Phases -- References -- 2 X-Ray Diffraction Studies of the Structure of Amorphous Polymers -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 The Interaction of X-rays With Matter -- 2.3 Order and Orientation in Polymers -- 2.4 Diffraction of X-rays by Amorphous Materials -- 2.5 Small Angle X-ray Scattering -- 2.6 The Radial Distribution Function for Amorphous Polymers -- References -- 3 Relaxation Processes in Amorphous Polymers -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 Molecular Motion in Polymeric Melts and Glasses -- 3.3 Secondary Relaxation Regions in Typical Organic Glasses -- References -- 4 Creep in Glassy Polymers -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.3 Apparatus and Experimental Methods -- 4.4 Creep Phenomena in Glassy Polymers -- 4.5 Final Comments -- References and Bibliography -- 5 The Yield Behaviour of Glassy Polymers -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.3 Mechanical Tests -- 5.4 Characteristics of the Yield Process -- 5.5 Inhomogeneous Deformation -- 5.6 Structural Observations -- 5.7 Yield Criteria for Polymers -- 5.8 Molecular Theories of Yielding -- References -- 6 The Post-Yield Behaviour of Amorphous Plastics -- 6.1 General -- 6.2 The Phenomena ofโ{128}{153} strain Softeningโ{128}{153} -- 6.3 Plastic Instability Phenomena -- 6.4 The Adiabatic Heating of Polymers Subject to Large Deformations -- 6.5 Orientation Hardening -- 6.6 Large Deformation and Fracture -- References -- 7 Cracking and Crazing in Polymeric Glasses -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Fracture Mechanics -- 7.3 Fatigue Fracture -- 7.4 Crazing -- 7.5 Molecular Fracture -- 7.6 Conclusion -- References -- 8 Rubber ReinForced Thermoplastics -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Rubber Reinforced Glassy Polymers of Commercial Importance -- 8.3 Methods of Manufacture -- 8.4 Incompatibility in Polymer Mixtures -- 8.5 Identification of Two Phase Rubber Reinforced Systems -- 8.6 Dispersed Phase Morphology -- 8.7 Optical Properties -- 8.8 Mechanical Properties -- References -- 9 The Diffusion and Sorption of Gases and Vapours in Glassy Polymers -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Ideal and Non-ideal Sorption and Diffusion of Fixed Gases -- 9.3 The Effect of the Glass Transition on Gas and Vapour Diffusion in Polymers -- 9.4 Relaxation Controlled Transport and Related Crazing of Polymeric Glasses by Vapours -- 9.5 Some Effects of Crystallinity and Orientation on the Transport of Gases and Vapours in Glassy Polymers -- References -- 10 The Morphology of Regular Block Copolymers -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Techniques Used for the Study of the Morphology of Block Copolymers -- 10.3 Variables Controlling the Morphology -- 10.4 Studies with Specific Systems -- 10.5 Theories of the Morphology of Block Copolymers -- 10.6 Implications of Theories and Comparison With Experiment -- 10.7 Mechanical Properties and Deformations -- 10.8 Crystallinity -- References -- Appendix I Glass Transition Temperatures and Expansion Coefficients for the Glass and Rubber States of some Typical Polymeric Glasses -- Appendix II Conversion Factors for SI Units


Science Science Science general



Location



Office of Academic Resources, Chulalongkorn University, Phayathai Rd. Pathumwan Bangkok 10330 Thailand

Contact Us

Tel. 0-2218-2929,
0-2218-2927 (Library Service)
0-2218-2903 (Administrative Division)
Fax. 0-2215-3617, 0-2218-2907

Social Network

  line

facebook   instragram