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TitleCurrent and New Directions in Discourse and Dialogue [electronic resource] / edited by Jan van Kuppevelt, Ronnie W. Smith
ImprintDordrecht : Springer Netherlands : Imprint: Springer, 2003
Connect tohttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-010-0019-2
Descript XII, 381 p. online resource

SUMMARY

The origins of this book arise from the highly successful second SIGdial Workshop on Discourse and Dialogue that was held in September 2001 in conยญ junction with Eurospeech 2001. The original workshop proceedings consisted of 29 papers selected from 57 submissions, an exceptionally high number of submissions for a two day workshop. This book includes extended versions of 12 papers originally presented at the workshop. In addition, 4 other invited papers on major themes in discourse and dialogue research are included. There are three main themes addressed by the papers in this collection: (1) corpus annotation and analysis; (2) methodยญ ologies for construction of dialogue systems; and (3) perspectives on various key theoretical issues including communicative intention, context-based genยญ eration, and modeling of discourse structure. However, because of the very nature of discourse and dialogue research that often requires researchers to tackle several issues in one piece of work, we have chosen to order the papers alphabetically by author rather than try to create artificial thematic sections. We believe this collection provides a concise yet reasonably comprehensive snapshot of major research themes in discourse and dialogue. We hope that readers will benefit greatly from this collection


CONTENT

1 Annotations and Tools for an Activity Based Spoken Language Corpus -- 1. Introduction -- 2. GSLC and Other Goteborg Corpora -- 3. Storage -- 4. Description of the Corpus Transcription Standard -- 5. Tools Which Have Been Developed -- 6. Types of Quantitative Analysis -- 7. Types of Qualitative Analysis -- 8. Conclusions and Future Directions -- References -- 2 Using Direct Variant Transduction for Rapid Development of Natural Spoken Interfaces -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Characteristics of Direct Variant Transduction -- 3. Constructing an Application with Example-Action Contexts -- 4. Context Expansion -- 5. Recognition, Classification and Matching -- 6. Dialog Control and Confirmation -- 7. Experiments -- 8. Concluding Remarks -- References -- 3 An Interface for Annotating Natural Interactivity -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Todayโ{128}{153}s Natural Interactivity Coding Tools -- 3. The Nite Project -- 4. Nite Target User Groups -- 5. General Tool Requirements -- 6. Annotation User Interface Requirements -- 7. The Audio-Visual Annotation Interface -- 8. Conclusion and Future Work -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 4 Managing Communicative Intentions with Collaborative Problem Solving -- 1. Previous Work -- 2. A Collaborative Problem-Solving Model -- 3. Examples -- 4. Use in Dialogue Systems -- 5. Conclusions and Future Work -- References -- 5 Building a Discourse-Tagged Corpus in the Framework of Rhetorical Structure Theory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Framework -- 3. Discourse Annotation Task -- 4. Quality Assurance -- 5. Corpus Overview -- 6. Mining the RST Corpus -- 7. Conclusions and Future Work -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 6 An Empirical Study of Speech Recognition Errors in Human Computer Dialogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Speech Recognition Component -- 3. Integrated Parsing of User Utterances -- 4. The Dialogue Process -- 5. From Speech Recognition Errors to Speech Act Recognition Errors -- 6. Evaluating Robustness to Speech Recognition Errors -- 7. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 7 Comparing Several Aspects of Human-Computer and Human-Human Dialogues -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Our Data -- 3. Analysis -- 4. Analysis of Misunderstandings -- 5. Discussion -- 6. Conclusions -- Appendix: Dialogue Act Tag Set and Examples -- References -- 8 Full Paraphrase Generation for Fragments in Dialogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. SHARDS -- 3. Generation of Fragment Paraphrases -- 4. An Implemented System for Fragment Resolution and Paraphrase Generation -- 5. Conclusion and Future Research -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 9 Disentangling Public from non-Public Meaning -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Uttererโ{128}{153}s Content v. Uttererโ{128}{153}s Plan -- 3. Clarifying Uttererโ{128}{153}s Content -- 4. Whymeta: an analysis -- 5. Concluding Remarks -- References -- 10 Adaptivity and Response Generation in a Spoken Dialogue System -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Interaction Management -- 3. Dialogue Response Generation -- 4. Confidence-based Adaptivity -- 5. Conclusion -- References -- 11 On the Means for Clarification in Dialogue -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Clarification Forms -- 3. Clarification Readings -- 4. Corpus Analysis -- 5. Conclusions -- Acknowledgements -- Appendix: Corpus Markup Decision Trees -- References -- 12 Plug and Play Spoken Dialogue Processing -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The CANTONA Plug and Play Demonstrator -- 3. Device Descriptions: Rules and Hierarchies -- 4. Plug and Play Response Generation -- 5. Plug and Play Speech Recognition and Parsing -- 6. Discussion -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 13 Conversational Implicatures and Communication Theory -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Particularized Conversational Implicatures -- 3. Generalized Conversational Implicatures -- References -- 14 Reconciling Control and Discourse Structure -- 1. Introduction -- 2. Discourse Structure and Control Analysis -- 3. Relationship between Control and Discourse Structure -- 4. Reconciling Control inside Discourse Segments -- 5. Conclusion -- 6. Future Work -- Acknowledgements -- References -- 15 The Information State Approach to Dialogue Management -- 1. Introduction -- 2. The Information State Approach -- 3. A Multi-level Architecture for Reusable Dialogue Management -- 4. TrindiKit: A Dialogue Move Engine Toolkit -- 5. Implementations using TrindiKit -- 6. Reusing Dialogue Management Components -- References -- 16 Visualizing Spoken Discourse -- 1. Introduction: Interruptions and Dialogue -- 2. Research Goals and Procedures -- 3. Prosodie Characteristics of Interruptions -- 4. Implications for Dialogue Systems -- 5. Conclusion -- Acknowledgements -- References


Linguistics User interfaces (Computer systems) Artificial intelligence Computational linguistics Semantics Linguistics Semantics Computational Linguistics Artificial Intelligence (incl. Robotics) Signal Image and Speech Processing User Interfaces and Human Computer Interaction



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