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น้อมรำลึกในพระมหากรุณาธิคุณหาที่สุดมิได้
ข้าพระพุทธเจ้า บุคลากรสำนักงานวิทยทรัพยากร จุฬาลงกรณ์มหาวิทยาลัย

สำนักงานวิทยทรัพยากร ปิดบริการวันหยุดนักขัตฤกษ์ วันที่ 10 , 12 ธันวาคม 2559
The Office of Academic Resources will be closed on  10, 12 December 2016 for public holidays.

CU-GDLN | สำนักงานวิทยทรัพยากร จุฬาลงกรณ์มหาวิทยาลัย [หอสมุดกลาง], Office of academic resources Chulalongkorn University {Central library]

ABOUT US

Introduction

Cooperation between the World Bank and Chulalongkorn University started from the Bank's realization of Chulalongkorn University's good academic standing, technological expertise and knowledge, and high potentials as an efficient center of knowledge. As a result, meetings were held between the Presidents of the World Bank and of Chulalongkorn University in January 1998, and between World Bank officials in Thailand and the university's administrators in September 1998 on the terms of cooperation between the two institutions. This agreement states that the World Bank and Chulalongkorn University will cooperate in the WB-CU Knowledge Management Project. The formal agreement signing for the project was held on July 22, 1999 and the Center of Academic Resources (OAR) was selected to represent Chulalongkorn University in developing this project.


CU-GDLN: Global Learning Network

From the initial projects between the World Bank and Chulalongkorn University, which were made possible through donations, further cooperation has ensued to develop another university project, Chulalongkorn University-Global Development Learning Network (CU-GDLN).

The World Bank established the Global Development Learning Network (GDLN) in 1997. GDLN is an offshoot of the World Bank Learning Network (WBLN), which links together World Bank offices worldwide. The learning programs are conducted between offices, clients and related parties. Because of its initial success, the World Bank decided to expand the network to include other organizations, particularly those involved in education.

GDLN is a telecommunications network that links together the World Bank's Distance Learning Centers (DLCs), which are found in different cities located around the world. GDLN has made possible through the cooperation of many different organizations, government, private sectors and NGOs to develop a multichannel network using the most advanced technology. This serves as a tool to reduce the so-called knowledge gap and to promote continuous dialogues between those who possess knowledge, provides opportunity for people to improve themselves and contributes to development. Distance learning is a communication channel that bypasses obstacles caused by time or distance restraints as well as language. It can provide interactive learning through formats of videoconferencing and the Internet for the greatest advantage, or as the GDLN slogan states, "Linking the World Through Learning".

From the year 2000 until now, there are approximately 120 DLCs in the network including those in 14 Asia Pacific countries, namely Thailand, Singapore, China, Japan, Vietnam, Australia, New Zealand, Timor-Leste, Mongolia, Philippines, South Korea, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Cambodia.

The DLC in Thailand is officially known as Chulalongkorn University-Global Development Learning Network (CU-GDLN). It is the first DLC in the Asia-Pacific region and had its soft launch in February 2000. Then along with the one in Singapore, they are the first two DLCs in the region, being officially launched on June 21, 2000. It is also among the first 15 DLCs that the World Bank supported to establish worldwide.

CU-GDLN received funds from the loan project of the University of Science and Engineering Education Project (USEEP), a project under the supervision of the Ministry of University Affairs that the World Bank has been supporting since 1994. The Ministry established an information network (UniNet) to support development in university education. It serves as a highway that links 24 state universities nationwide together as well as to foreign databases. Meanwhile, CU-GDLN was established as part of the Office of Academic Resources' network, CARNET, a sub network of Chulalongkorn University's network or CUNET, which is linked to UniNet. Thus, it not only serves the learning requirements of the university community, but also virtually outreaches every region in Thailand. As it is also linked to the World Bank's GDLN, it is thus linked to other DLCs in many countries simultaneously.

HILIGHT

**Workshop on Ethics in Public Health Research**




Chulalongkorn University is presently pursuing one of its ultimate goals, to become a fulfilled research university.  The Ethics Review Committee for Research Involving Human Research Subjects, Health Sciences Group, Chulalongkorn University, (ECCU) has been established since mid of 2002 for reviewing and monitoring health sciences researches involving human subjects.
Performances of the ECCU have been recognized by SIDCER/FERCAP since 26 November 2008 for graduate studies in research ethics. It is very important that research ethics should not only be regarded as a subject to learn but to practice as well. In order to promote importance of research ethics in public health, training on Ethics in Public Health Research (A three-day course) which is relevant to situation of the countries should be conducted.

Objectives
1.    To understand the ethical guidelines for conducting researches involving human subjects.
2.    To be able to identify risk and benefit to research participants and know process of informed consent, especially among vulnerable groups.
3.    To realize importance of ethics for researcher.
4.    To realize the crucial issues of ethics in public health research.
5.    To sensitize public health professionals on ethical issues in public health research.




RECENT ACTIVITIES

APO e-Learning Course on Innovative Approaches in Marketing of Agrifood Products



25-28 October 2016


Background

The marketing of agrifood products involves numerous interconnected activities such as planning production, growing and harvesting, grading, packing, transport, storage, agro- and food processing, distribution, advertising, and sales. Small farmers, who constitute vast majority of the Asian farming community, rely on intermediaries or middlemen to market their produce. Long marketing chains of agricultural products involve multiple actors and several intermediaries. These middlemen often maximize their profits by buying the agricultural products at low prices and selling them at higher prices. While the consumers pay more, the farmers receive very low returns. 

To ensure that reasonable prices for agricultural produce are received by farmers, there is a need to promote marketing models that involve no or fewer middlemen and rationalize their roles. Examples of such models include direct marketing, e-marketing or online marketing, and agricultural cooperatives. Those embracing these emerging models still need to undertake numerous interconnected activities required for successful marketing such as planning production, growing, harvesting, grading, packing, transport, storage, processing, distribution, advertising, and sales. They must understand the basics of developing marketing strategies for their products and buyer requirements, both in terms of product and business conditions. 


Objective

a.  To enhance participants' understanding of the issues and constraints faced by farmers and agribusinesses in marketing their products in a globalized environment;

b.  To acquaint participants with the emerging marketing models for agrifood products; and

c.  To identify those models that can be promoted among and adopted by SMEs in member countries.


Speakers

Mr. Chan Seng Kit

Managing Director, K-Farm Sdn Bhd, Selangor Darul Eshan, Malaysia


Mr. Jun Chanoki

Senior Consultant, 5 plus 2 Corporation Limited, Chiba, Japan


Dr. Nerlita M. Manalili

Managing Director, NEXUS Agribusiness Solutions, Philippines



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KDI 2016 GDLN Distance Learning Seminar Series:

Infrastructure Development and Public-Private Partnership

8 June - 28 September 2016

Thailand: 14:00-15:30


Introduction

Knowledge sharing for sustainable development and global prosperity is one of the key motivations behind establishing the KDI School of Public Policy and Management. The KDI School understands the valuable role the GDLN can play as an effective tool for knowledge sharing and learning. As part of the designated GDLN Korean Center’s knowledge exchange initiatives, the KDI School is launching blended learning programs that focus on Korea’s successful development experiences.

Infrastructure development in both an economic and social context has contributed greatly in Korea’s socioeconomic development. With more than 15 years of rich experience in implementing Public-Private Partnership (PPP) projects in infrastructure, Korea has grown and developed into a stable and profitable PPP market, largely due to the government’s systemic support and management, including the implementation of the PPP Act. Reflecting on such development experience in infrastructure and PPP, Korea is in a unique position to share its experiences with emerging and developing countries as a means of furthering global development.

This series will be an opportunity for participants to think critically about development policies in these areas and how it has affected the country’s overall development strategies. Participants are encouraged to take part in discussions and share their professional experiences in the area of infrastructure development and PPP.


Objective

The objective of the program is to enhance the role and impact of the GDLN in connecting practitioners, policy-makers, academics, students and facilitators of development; and to provide a multi-dimensional approach to learning about Korea’s development experiences.


Schedule


Recorded Video  https://www.gdln.or.kr/sub/programs/program.asp?sel=1



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APO e-Learning Course on Value Addition to Agrifood products 


20-23 September 2016


Background

Value addition to agricultural products has enonnous potential for increasing productivity, incomes, and off-farm employment opportunities in developing countries. However, in many APO member countries this has not been consciously practiced, especially at the level of small farms and enterprises. In many instances, agricultural products are sold in their basic raw form in local as well as upstream markets. Some of the reasons for this pervading practice include the lack of postharvest, handling, and storage facilities at the farm level and the lack of knowledge of small farmers and service providers on value-adding tools and tecbniques. If properly promoted and adopted, value addition can encourage intensive, diversified use of local agricultural raw materials, development of collateral and/or complementary enterprises, and thus job creation, especially in rural areas.

In view of the immense importance of enhancing agricultural productivity and farm incomes while improving rural livelihoods, there is an immediate need to enhance the capacities of key stakeholders for modernizing food chains in the region through value addition to agrifood products. Policy incentives will be needed to encourage producers and other stakeholders to adopt modem value-added techniques. It is important for producers and related agribusiness related players and food-industry SME entrepreneurs to have the skills and know-how to add value to agricultural and food products and increase their profitability. There is also a need to develop the capacity and competency of trainers in value-addition skills, management tools, techniques, and technologies.


Objective

To acquaint participants with recent developments and new tools and techniques in value addition to agricultural and food products for increasing the productivity and profitability of SMEs.


Speakers

Mr. Waheed Ahmad

Manager / Consultant, Capital Food Industries


Dr. Kheng Soon Rodney Wee

Chief Executive / Principal Consultant, Asia Cold Chian Centre (Singapore)


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KDI G-20 GLOBAL LEADERSHIP PROGRAM

Korea’s Experience : Public and Private Sectors-Competition Policies


4 April 2016
Thailand: 12:00 – 14:00


Introduction

The G-20 Global Leadership Program is being co-hosted by the Ministry of Strategy and Finance, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and the Korea Development Institute (KDI) School of Public Policy and Management. The program serves as an integral part of Korea’s commitment to the G-20 Seoul Development Consensus for Shared Growth “to add value to and complement existing development commitments.” The objective of the program is to enable participants to enhance their contributions towards reaching G-20 development goals set forth at the Seoul Summit and drive the momentum in implementing action plans so continuity is established at each subsequent G-20 Summit.

The KDI School has a strong commitment for knowledge sharing. In line with this commitment, this section of the G-20 Global Leadership Program on “Korea’s Experience : Public and Private Sectors-Competition Policies” is being shared with the GDLN network. As the participants of the G-20 program share their respective professional and country experiences throughout the program, we also encourage the GDLN affiliate members and your respective participants to join the session.


Speaker

Prof. Woochan Kim

Korea University



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AFDI Financial Inclusion in Internet Economy: Innovation and New Models


19 November 2015

Thailand: 13:00 – 15:00

Background
Financial inclusion is the delivery of financial services at affordable costs to sections of disadvantaged and low-income segments of society, in contrast to financial exclusion where those services are not available or affordable. The great challenges in the process of developing inclusive finance are asymmetric information and high transaction cost. In the internet economy, with the help of Internet, mobile terminals, big data, cloud computing, social networking and other next-generation communication technologies, Internet is changing traditional financial model and strongly penetrating into financial fields. The problems, such as information asymmetry and transaction cost of traditional financial system has been improved greatly in internet platform. We should pay attention to the convenience for the development of inclusive finance brought by internet economy.


Nowadays, the Asia-Pacific region remains one of the areas with the greatest economic development vitality in the world, and developing the economy is the most important task for each country. It is very important to further promote the innovation of grassroots and development of SMEs. Therefore, many countries, including China, have financial inclusion as an important part of financial system. The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Institute (AFDI) was established by the Chinese government aiming to strengthen institutional capacity building in the areas of finance and development for the developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region. This seminar is one of the activities to promote capacity building on financial inclusion.

Objective
In order to summarize and share experience on“Financial inclusion in internet economy ”, AFDI plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2015 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges for the Newly-Emerged Economies.


Speaker
Dr. LI Zhiqiang
Associate Professor of China Executive Leadership Academy,Pudong



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APO e-Learning Course on Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) for Greater Market Access

4-6 November 2015

Background

With international trade in food booming, consumers are increasingly concerned about food safety and how food is produced and how it is handled within supply chains. New pressures from consumers, retailers, and legislation have placed additional demands on farmers and producers. They are increasingly required to use production methods that reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the environment, reduce their use of agrochemicals, and make efficient use of natural resources (land and water), while safeguarding the welfare of workers and farm animals. GAP could be the solution for producers seeking to address consumer concerns in domestic and foreign markets.

The GAP concept addresses two distinct issues: ensuring food safety during on-farm and post-production processes to build consumer confidence in the products; and enhancing environmental sustainability for continued productive farm operations. The development and adoption of GAP have become increasingly important in light of increasing regional and international trade in food products and growing consciousness of consumers of the quality and safety of the food products they buy. Agricultural producers, particularly small farmers, need to have their farms certified as GAP compliant to enhance the acceptability of their products.

Several countries have developed their own GAP standards and certification systems. However, the lack of harmonization between GAP schemes among countries and scarcity of affordable certification systems have often led to increased confusion and higher certification costs for farmers and exporters. The GLOBALGAP standard now serves as key reference for GAP worldwide as this is increasingly being recognized internationally by retailers. It is a single, integrated standard with modular applications for different product groups, ranging from plants, livestock, and aquaculture to plant propagation materials and compound animal feed.

An understanding of the principlesand standards of GAP and benchmarking of national GAP against GLOBALGAP are essential so that stakeholders in various APO member countries can improve agricultural practices, facilitate exports, and reduce the cost of multiple audits by meeting established GAP standards.

This e-learning course is designed to address these needs of various stakeholders with emphasis on Good Agricultural Practice (GAP) for Greater Market Access in APO member countries.

Objectives
1) To enhance participants’ understanding of the benefits and importance of GAP for increasing access of agrifood products to international markets;
2) To familiarize participants with the GAP concept, adoption process, and certification methodology; and
3) To review the status of and procedures for benchmarking of national GAP with other internationally recognized GAP standards.

Speakers
Mr. Chan Seng Kit
Managing Director, K-Farm Sdn Bhd, Selangor Darul Eshan, Malaysia

Dr. Friedrich Luedeke
Senior Expert / Training, Sales and Marketing, GLOBALG.A.P., Koeln, Germany

Mr. Yasuaki Takeda
Managing Director, Japan Good Agricultural Practices, Tokyo, Japan


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AFDI Current State of Financial Inclusion Developing: Lessons and Challenges

17 September 2015
Thailand: 13:00 – 15:30


Background

Financial inclusion is the delivery of financial services at affordable costs to sections of disadvantaged and low-income segments of society, in contrast to financial exclusion where those services are not available or affordable. The great challenges in the process of developing inclusive finance are asymmetric information and high transaction cost. In the internet economy, with the help of Internet, mobile terminals, big data, cloud computing, social networking and other next-generation communication technologies, Internet is changing traditional financial model and strongly penetrating into financial fields. The problems, such as information asymmetry and transaction cost of traditional financial system has been improved greatly in internet platform. We should pay attention to the convenience for the development of inclusive finance brought by internet economy.

Nowadays, the Asia-Pacific region remains one of the areas with the greatest economic development vitality in the world, and developing the economy is the most important task for each country. It is very important to further promote the innovation of grassroots and development of SMEs. Therefore, many countries, including China, have financial inclusion as an important part of financial system. The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Institute (AFDI) was established by the Chinese government aiming to strengthen institutional capacity building in the areas of finance and development for the developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region. This seminar is one of the activities to promote capacity building on financial inclusion.

Objective
In order to summarize and share experience on“Financial inclusion in internet economy ”, AFDI plans to launch a series of VC seminars in 2015 in collaboration with the World Bank and other GDLN affiliates to cope with opportunities and challenges for the Newly-Emerged Economies.

Speaker

Mr. BAI Chengyu
Director, China International Center for Economic and Technical Exchanges, Ministry of Commerce

Recorded Video  Click


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KDI 2015 GDLN Distance Learning Seminar Series:

Human Capital and Innovation Policies

14 May - 14 September 2015

Thailand: 14:00-15:30


Objective
Knowledge sharing for sustainable development and global prosperity is one of the key motivations behind establishing the KDI School of Public Policy and Management. The KDI School understands the valuable role the GDLN can play as an effective tool for knowledge sharing and learning. As part of the designated GDLN Korean Center’s knowledge exchange initiatives, the KDI School is launching blended learning programs that focus on Korea’s successful development experiences.

Transitioning from an aid recipient to an OECD-DAC donor, Korea has achieved remarkable economic growth, democratization and social stability in less than half a century. With Korea’s extraordinary development widely acknowledged and documented, Korea is in a unique position to share its experiences with emerging and developing countries as a means of furthering global development. The GDLN Korean Center is committed to providing optimal opportunities for development practitioners all over the world to learn from not only Korea’s development experiences, but also to offer peer-to-peer learning opportunities among participating practitioners.

The objective of the program is to enhance the role and impact of the GDLN in connecting practitioners, policy-makers, academics, students and facilitators of development; and to provide a multi-dimensional approach to learning about Korea’s development experiences.

Schedule


Recorded Video  https://www.gdln.or.kr/sub/programs/program.asp?sel=1

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APO e-Leaming Course on Nonchemical Pest Management in Agriculture


8-10 September 2015

Background
Insect, plant pathogen, and weed pests destroy more than 40% of all potential food production each year. The heaviest losses are in developing countries. Appropriate agricultural pest management control strategies can enhance food security and the safety of agricultural and food products. The two main types of pest control methods are chemical and nonchemical.

The use of synthetic chemical pesticides is the most common pest control method worldwide. Chemical pesticides are fast acting but expensive. Chemicals in pesticides can be harmful to people, animals, or the environment. Some pests can develop resistance to those chemicals, rendering chemical control ineffective. The risks associated with the use of chemical pesticides are even higher among small fanners because of low purchasing power and lack of skills to obtain and handle pesticides appropriately. To address such externalities associated with farming, there have been attempts to replace the use of synthetic chemical insecticides with nonchemical pest management (NCPM).

NCPM practices are less expensive, ecologically safe, and socio-friendly. They employ various pest-control techniques that do not rely on synthetic chemical pesticides. These techniques include biological control (e.g., crop rotation, planting pest-free rootstock, predator insects, the sterile insect technique), natural chemical control (e.g., pheromones, organic pesticides), and genetic control (e.g., pest-resistant crops/varieties, genetically modified microbial pesticides, herbicide-tolerant crops). An integrated pest management (IPM) strategy is needed to promote the adoption of NCPM. IPM uses a judicious combination ofpest-control practices and methods to prevent problems from occurring rather than dealing with them after they have happened.

The main impediments to scaling up the adoption of NCPM are the traditional mindset of farmers favoring the use of chemical pesticides, lack of site-specific and farmer-led approaches, lack of appropriate local institutional settings, absence of regulatory frameworks for biopesticides, and no incentives for framers to adopt such sustainable practices. Policy incentives will be needed to convmce farmers to adopt sustainable farming practices such as NCPM and provide them with insurance against the risk of crop losses from alternative practices. In the long run, governments could save money by reducing future health, regulatory, and environmental clean-up costs.

Objectives
1) To acquaint participants with recent developments and the latest trends in NCPM strategies, approaches, techniques, and methods in agriculture.
2) To promote environment- and socio-friendly food production to enhance sustainable food security.

Speakers
Dr. Ooi Aun Chuan
Professorial Chair, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman (UTAR)

Dr. Yoshiharu  Fujii
Professor, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology

Dr. Jorge Hendrichs

Head, Insect Pest Control Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division
International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)



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KDI e-Government

10 August 2015
Thailand: 7:30 - 8:50


This videoconference included the following topics:

•  Challenges to Government
•  ICT, internet and mobile phones
•  The nature & status of e-government
•  Development of e-government, etc.

Speaker
M. Jae Moon

Professor, Department of Public Administration, Yonsei University

Recorded Video https://www.gdln.or.kr/sub/programs/program.asp?sel=1


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KDI Energy System in the 21st Century


29 July 2015
Thailand: 7:30 - 8:50


This videoconference included the following topics:

•  Building concepts of sustainable energy consumption
•  Clean energy - supply stress conditions
•  Opportunities with new energy markets
•  Navigating the energy future we want
•  Principles of good energy policy design


Speaker
Anbumozhi Venkhachalam
Fellow & Capacity Building Specialist, Asian Development Bank Institute (ADBI)


Recorded Video 
https://www.gdln.or.kr/sub/programs/program.asp?sel=1


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AFDI Case Study-Oriented Blended Learning Program on
Financing Infrastructures: Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) Model

4 June - 16 July 2015


Background

Development in infrastructure has become one of the most pressing challenges for accelerating economic development and social progress, especially in Asia-Pacific countries. As globalism and regionalism ensues, tremendous private capital can be tapped for infrastructure projects. PPP has become an important mechanism for responding to the challenges of infrastructure development.
 
APEC is an important platform for economic cooperation in the Asia-Pacific region. Cooperation on infrastructure investment and financing has been identified as an important policy theme for the APEC Finance Ministers’ Meeting (FMM) in 2014. In recent years, China witnessed a rapid growth in infrastructure provision. At the same time, the government also feels a tremendous financial pressure. Therefore, the Chinese government put forward many measures to promote the development of private investment, especially in infrastructure field. The government is now promoting the PPP model in infrastructure financing, which is conducive to promote the further reform of China and the efficiency of economic development.
 
The Asia-Pacific Finance and Development Institute (AFDI) is established by the Chinese government aiming to strengthen institutional capacity building in the areas of finance and development for the developing economies in the Asia-Pacific region.


Objective
To summarize and share experience on “PPP model” 


Program
This program consists of 
• AFDI Mobile Learning Community
via WeChat
• Videoconferencing Seminars
Session 1     4 June 2015      at 1:00 – 3:40  PM
Session 2     25 June 2015    at 1:00 – 3:30  PM
Session 3     16 July 2015     at 1:00 – 3:00  PM

• Face-to-Face Learning 
Participants who actively attend the AFDI Mobile Learning Community and GDLN Videoconferencing Seminars and finish assignment and country report with a good quality will have the opportunity to attend the Face-to-Face Learning Programs on relevant topics in Shanghai, China (probably in November or December).


Speakers
Dr. Victor Chuan Chen
Professor, Business School, Sichuan University; Consultant, World Bank PPIAF;
Member, WEF GAC on Infrastructure


Dr. Chen Li
Senior Economist & Deputy Director,
Urban Economic Development and Construction Division,
Shanghai Municipal Finance Bureau 


Recorded Video
Session 1     4 June 2015      http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/7yyt7
Session 2     25 June 2015    http://www.kaltura.com/tiny/31yb2
Session 3     16 July 2015     https://www.kaltura.com/tiny/1t71b


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TDLC Mental Health & Psychosocial Well-being after Disasters:

Global Updates and the Philippines' Experience


30 June 2015
Thailand: 13:30 - 15:00


Introduction

During and after disasters, people experience mental and psychosocial distress, and this plays a key role in determining their quality of life, resilience and the success of their preparedness, recovery and ability to reconstruct.

Mental well-being and disability also have vast implications on mortality. In addition, economic loss due to problems related to mental well-being is far-reaching: Direct and indirect costs of mental illness exceed 4% of GDP.

Though, mental well-being and disability have long been neglected or forgotten in disaster risk reduction policies and programs, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction adopted at the UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction 2015 included mental health and psychosocial well-being as a key priority.

This distance knowledge sharing program will provide an opportunity to learn about global updates as well as experiences in the Philippines, through web/VC-based lectures and discussions.


Goal
To provide a knowledge sharing opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM and global health in Asia and the Pacific, to learn good practices and lessons learned related to mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings from experience in the Philippines and Japan.

This program is jointly organized by the World Bank Tokyo Development Learning Center and the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health.


Speakers

Dr. Dinah Nadera
President, Foundation for Advancing Wellness, Instruction and Talents, Inc.
Associate Professor of International Health, University of the Philippines Open University Technical Officer for Mental Health, WHO Philippines

Dr. Atsuro Tsutsumi (TBC)

Coordinator
United Nations University International Institute for Global Health


Recorded Video  https://www.jointokyo.org/en/programs/catalogue/MHPSWB_Philippines


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TDLC Sharing good practices on

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD)


30 June 2015
Thailand: 9:30-11:30


Introduction

Cities in developing countries are growing at an unprecedented rate and scale. With rising incomes, cities will expand outward, following the trajectory of automobile-dependent urban development evident in developed countries, where such development is often accompanied by the negative impacts of sprawl such as traffic congestion and air pollution. Transit and land-use integration is one of the most promising means of reversing the negative trends of sprawl and placing cities in developing countries on a sustainable pathway.

Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) is a major solution in promoting sustainable urban growth and development. Done well, TOD advances economic development, environmental sustainability, and -inclusive social development. The rapid growth of urban areas and increasing investment in urban transportation systems in the developing world presents a unique opportunity of TOD, including possible Land Value Capture to raise funds needed for transit investment.

In this seminar, drawing on the WBG’s experiences in East Asia and South Asia, the challenges of automobile driven urban development faced by client countries and their TOD endeavors to address these challenges, among others, will be discussed. Japan’s long history and experience in TOD and Land Value Captures, which have helped them to convert their cities into world class transit metropolises will also be shared in this session.

Speakers
Takeo Murakami
Director for International Negotiations Management Policy Bureau, MLIT

Hiroaki Suzuki
Lecturer, University of Tokyo

Taimur Samad
Senior Urban Economist, Global Practice on Social, Urban, Rural, and Resilience, World Bank Group


Recorded Video https://www.jointokyo.org/en/programs/catalogue/KS_TOD


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TDLC Psychological First Aid (PFA)

Mutual Support for Resiliency after Crisis



19 June 2015

Thailand: 9:00 - 12:30


Introduction
Different kinds of crises such as war, natural disasters, accidents, fires and interpersonal violence including sexual and gender-based violence occur in the world.

Although every person has strengths and abilities to cope with life challenges, mental health and psychosocial support can be beneficial in some cases.

WHO, War Trauma Foundation and World Vision International published “Psychological First Aid: Field Guide” (PFA Field Guide) in 2011 to provide an easy-to-understand guidance on what to do and what not to do when trying to support a fellow human being after going through a serious crisis event.

The PFA Field Guide has been endorsed by the UN, UNICEF, UNHCR, ICRC, Plan International, among others. The PFA has been widely employed in Japan after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

This distance orientation program will promote participants’ understandings on basics of PFA, do’s and don’ts, and self-care technique, through web/VC-based lectures and discussions. The program will provide basic knowledge on how to offer PFA, as well as basics on mental health and psychosocial support after crises which will be an emerging priority in disaster risk management policy and programs.

The program will be organized jointly by the World Bank/TDLC, UNU-IIGH, and the National Institute of Mental Health in Japan, in close partnership with WHO.
 
We deliver the program periodically and this will be the fourth delivery of this session.


Goals
To provide a learning opportunity for policy makers and other change agents engaged in DRM and global health in Asia and the Pacific, to learn basics of PFA, in order to raise awareness on importance to integrate mental health and psychosocial perspectives in their respective DRM/health policies/programs, as well as to develop capacity for them to provide safe support in crisis situations.


Speakers
Dr. Makiko Ishida
Assistant Professor, Teikyo University

Dr. Ryoko Ohtaki
Associate Researcher, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry,
National Institute of Mental Health, National Information Center of Disaster Mental Health 



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TDLC DistanceKnowledge Sharing on Suicide Prevention:

Country Experience from Malaysia


23 February 2015

Thailand: 10:00-11:30


Background

WHO estimates that almost one million deaths are due to suicide every year, the majority of which occur in low- and middle-income countries. Attempted suicide can be up to 20 times more frequent than suicide. As suicide is among the top three causes of death in the population aged 15-34 years (second leading causefor 10-24 year olds) globally, there is a massive loss to societies of young people. There is a need for immediate action which includes public health andcross-sector/inter-agency approaches.


Goals

To respond to this neglected but important global priority, WHO launched the first-ever World Suicide Reportin late 2014.

According to the report, Malaysias percentage change in age standardized suicide rates 20002012 is-23.9% for both sexes.

Tokyo Development Learning Center, the World Bank together with the United Nations University International Institute for Global Health presents the distance knowledge sharing seminar to focus on country case studies, including good practices and lessons learned.


Speaker

Dr Nurashikin Ibrahim

Ministry of Health, Malaysia


Dr Andrew Mohan Raj

Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Perdana University, Malaysia


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NETWORK


Australia

Australian National University (ANU)

China

Beijing Training Management Center

Chongqing Technology and Business University

Gansu Administrative Institute

Guangxi Provincial Department of Personnel

Guizhou Administrative Institute

Neimeng Administrative Institute

Ningxia University

Qinghai Administrative Institute

Shanghai National Accounting Institute (SNAI)

Sichuan Administrative Institute

Xinjiang Administrative Institute

Xi’an University of Architecture and Technology

Yunnan University

Indonesia

Hasanuddin University (Makassar)

University of Indonesia (Jakarta)

University of Riau (Pekanbaru)

University of Udayana (Denpasar)

Japan

Tokyo Development Learning Center (TDLC)

Mongolia

Mongolia Development Learning Center

Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea Development Cooperation Center (DCC)

Philippines

Asian Institute of Management - World Bank Development Resource Center (AIM-WB DRC, Manila)

South Korea

Korea Development Institute (KDI) School of Public Policy and Management (Seoul)

Timor Leste

Dili Distance Learning Center (DDLC)

Vietnam

Ho Chi Minh Development Learning Center

Vietnam Development Information Center (VDIC)

CONTACT US

Chulalongkorn University - Global Development Learning Network (CU-GDLN)

Office of Academic Resources

Chulalongkorn University

Phaya Thai Road,Bangkok 10330

Tel: (662)2182905

Email: gdln@car.chula.ac.th